Carrier Interconnection Agreements

Traditionally, an interconnection agreement (ICA) is a regulated contract between telecommunications operators for the purpose of connecting their networks and transmitting traffic over the PSTN NETWORK. Contractual agreements between service providers defining the conditions applicable to the exchange of data between these service providers are more frequently described. Related Articles: AT&T, Verizon, Windstream Joins MEF to Advance Ethernet Connection CenturyLink, Frontier, TelePacific Join MEF`s Ethernet Interconnection Points Project at AT&T, Level 3 Threatens International Ethernet Expansion BT, Oranges Hold CenturyLink, AT&T Ethernet, Fiber Optic-Based Service Goal for Small Businesses In accordance with 47 USC 259(b)(7), The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has imposed rules, requiring all established local carriers (ILECs) to provide eligible network operators with technological, information and telecommunications infrastructure, equipment and functions enabling a qualified network operator to provide telecommunications services or access information services in the field of activity where the eligible network operator has been designated as an operator Approved Telecommunications (ETC) pursuant to 47 USC 214 (e). A qualified operator is defined as a telecommunications operator that lacks certain advantages in terms of scale or scale and that offers all consumers, in its designated ETC service sector, telephony services, brokering access and all other services that are part of the universal service. Since established firms often perceive that the value of potential losses outweighs profits, established firms often have strategies to impede interconnection and protect their markets. for example, by delaying the implementation of the interconnection agreement or by imposing excessive charges on new entrants. Accordingly, interventions or guidelines by regulatory authorities are considered necessary to promote a healthy competitive environment. As global trade is increasingly integrated and paperless, effective networking is important to enable activities such as e-banking, e-commerce, mobile roaming and e-mail. Effective networking also facilitates the implementation of new technologies, as countries benefit from global connectivity and seek cost-effective technologies. Although the term Interconnection and access are often used synonymously, many industry experts prefer to distinguish between the two. Intven et al. (2000) describe the distinction as follows: IEs consist of all the elements of the Ethernet connection, including all the requirements necessary to provide an end-to-end Ethernet service to a customer on multiple carriers. In concrete terms, the MEF looked at site selection, E-NNI parameters and the direction of business processes.

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